Stefano Gabbana Thinks the Fashion Industry Needs Rehab

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Stefano Gabbana

Last winter Stefano Gabbana started asking questions when he saw cotton shorts in one of his Dolce & Gabbana stores in Milan. Why, God, why? “As a consumer I said, ‘No, this makes no sense,’” he told WWD. By gosh — he’s right! Allow him to elaborate with a metaphor:

“I don’t want cherries or strawberries at Christmas anymore. I want to eat, dress and live on time,” he said with vexation.

Last winter Stefano Gabbana started asking questions when he saw cotton shorts in one of his Dolce & Gabbana stores in Milan. Why, God, why? “As a consumer I said, ‘No, this makes no sense,’” he told WWD. By gosh — he’s right! Allow him to elaborate with a metaphor:


The diction in that sentence was indeed stupendous, but do not allow it to distract you from the economic issues at hand. Gabbana said his company is “rationalizing costs” like a family “forced to cut back on the movies or the weekly supply of Parmesan cheese.” He plans to put out smaller, more focused collections. Also, Dolce & Gabbana will now do only pre-fall or cruise and the runway line, cutting the collection they usually do in between. And as for those pesky — nay, vexing — cotton shorts on the sales floor in November? Dolce & Gabbana plans to thwart such inanity by delaying deliveries to stores. WWD reports:

“If one stops and analyzes the scenario, you ask yourself what’s this mad rush for, for who, for what? Does the average consumer really care?” he queried. “A normal shopper, even an elitist one like ours, buys a down jacket in November based on the weather.”


Yes, what is this mad rush? Show us the way, Europeans! We’d look for it, but we’re too busy stressing out over our spring wardrobes.

Stefano Gabbana Sounds Off About the System [WWD]

Stefano Gabbana Thinks the Fashion Industry Needs Rehab