Finally, We Are Approaching Booze Equality

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Take that, gender gaps.
Take that, gender gaps. Photo: Alistair Berg/Getty Images

Recently we learned that the wage gap won’t disappear for another 118 years, which might have you reaching for the rosé. Well, pour it up, sisters: Your swigging could help us shrink another disparity marker, the drinking gap.

According to a new report from the National Institutes of Health, the drinking habits of men and women are becoming more similar, with men imbibing less than they used to and women drinking more. The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) looked at annual survey data from 2002 to 2012 and found that monthly drinking rates fell from 57.4 percent to 56 percent of men, and increased from 45 percent to 48 percent for women. Ladies also reported more drinking days per month at 7.3 (up from 6.8), while men slowed down in that department, too (9.5 days versus 9.9).

As the authors said in a release, “males still consume more alcohol, but the differences between men and women are diminishing.” Progress! Technically, drinking more is bad for our health, but on the bright side, despite these increases, women’s rates of alcohol use disorder and driving under the influence did not go up. Carry on, team.

Finally, We Are Approaching Booze Equality