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Above: Autumn, age 14 months. Dolce & Gabbana cotton onesie, bib, and hat set, $395 at dolcegabbana.com.

In 2018, it is neither rare nor exorbitantly weird to see a child and think: I want what he/she/they are wearing. Luxury brands like Burberry, Gucci, Dolce & Gabbana, and now Balenciaga all offer their own youth collections — and business is booming. According to a Global Industry Analysts estimate, the global childrenswear market is expected to reach 231.3 billion euros by 2024.

Meanwhile, on Instagram, you can find Supreme-wearing children with millions of followers. Plus, millennial and Gen-Z moms like 20-year-old Kylie Jenner are eager to dress their kids up in the same clothes they fancy.

Not everyone is down with designer fetishism for the under-10 set, of course. But then, no matter what you dress them in, kids will always be kids. —Emilia Petrarca

Aidan, age 2, and Dylan, age 4. Young Versace poplin shirt, $265, and jeans, $300, at versace.com; Young Versace silk dress, $540 at versace.com. Photo: Bobby Doherty/New York Magazine
Greydon, age 5. Burberry reversible cotton jacket, $850 at burberry.com. Photo: Bobby Doherty/New York Magazine
Shiloh, age 5. Burberry reversible cotton jacket, $850 at burberry.com. Photo: Bobby Doherty/New York Magazine
Zella, age 7. Balenciaga cotton hoodie, $350, and cotton sweatpants, $250, at balenciaga.com; Balenciaga knit sneakers, $295 at Bergdorf Goodman, 754 Fifth Ave. Photo: Bobby Doherty/New York Magazine
Jaylyn, age 9. Gucci nylon-tulle dress, $1,850 at Bergdorf Goodman, 754 Fifth Ave. Photo: Bobby Doherty/New York Magazine
Autumn, 14 months, in a Dolce & Gabbana onesie. Photo: Bobby Doherty/New York Magazine

*A version of this article appears in the April 30, 2018, issue of New York Magazine. Subscribe Now!

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